Fiji Finals Guide Draft

With every pledge class that comes through Phi Gamma Delta and other Greek organizations at WSU and college campuses nationwide, there is a sad but consistent truth. That group of freshman you and your brothers/sisters worked so hard this summer to recruit and are excited to welcome into your brotherhood/sisterhood will not be the same size as it was on bid day come spring semester. This is for a number of reasons, but the one that sticks out the most is that many freshmen are not prepared for the unstructured freedom that comes with moving away from home. They spend their time playing video games, chasing girls and skipping class only to find out at midterms that they are academically deficient and end up failing out of school. For many of them, making grades or reluctantly leaving WSU much earlier than anticipated comes down to the last two weeks of school: dead week and finals week.
As a senior, I have survived through four semesters at WSU after transferring from community college. Some terms have been better than others, but I thought it would be highly beneficial to share my experience and advice with the current freshmen and future classes with a video tutorial on how to make it through dead and finals week, based on what I have learned from my time as a Fiji and a Cougar. As older members of the house, my brothers and I cannot force them to study or be their parents, only lead through example by following the guidelines of our organization set in place by our founding fathers. Phi Gamma Delta places a strong emphasis on organizing priorities in the order of scholarship, fraternity and self, a key formula for academic and fraternal success. In this video, you will see how our motto is emphasized, contributing to successful first semester and more to follow at WSU.
To record this video, I rented a camera from the Academic Media Services at WSU for several days and edited the footage in Adobe Premier. I then used a hand-held recording device so that I could add narrative to the project. After the raw video and narrative were compiled into one, I used a number of the video effects I learned through the online tutorials for this class to make transitions between the scenes.

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Storyboard and Script

Here is the storyboard and script for my video project. 

Storyboard:

Time

Video

Audio

0:00-0:22

Brian studying at desk

Ambient noise

0:22-0:32

Brian goes from studying to collapsing on desk

“Fiji Finals Guide 2012” appears on screen.

Ambient noise leading into “thump” from head hitting book

0:32-0:42

Brian introduces the theme of the video.

Narrative 1

0:42-0:50

“Scholarship, Fraternity and Self” transition onto screen.

Narrative 1

0:50-1:18

Video transitions back to Brian on screen.

Narrative 2

1:19-1:29

Video transitions into Brian leaving the chapter house in a tank top.

Narrative 3

1:29-1:36

Brian leaves the house in appropriate attire for cold weather

Narrative 3

1:36-1:44

Video transitions into Brian studying on bed

Narrative 4

 

 

 

1:44-1:48

Video transitions into Brian sleeping on bed

Narrative 4

1:48-1:51

Video transitions into setting multiple alarms on cell phone.

Narrative 5

1:51- 1:57

Video transitions into making a lists of finals schedule.

Narrative 5

1:57-2:10

Video transitions into Brian’s hands holding an energy drink and prescription drugs.

Narrative6

2:10-2:19

Video transitions into Brian’s hands holding Muscle Milk and a coffee mug.

Narrative 6

2:19-2:29

Video transitions and goes through breakfast sequence.

Narrative 7

2:29-2:37

Widescreen shots of CUB through day and night.

Narrative 8

2:37-2:41

Video transitions to Daniel making coffee

Narrative 8

2:41-2:42

Close up shot of Daniel filling ramen noodles cup

Narrative 8

 

2:42-2:46

Tyler puts ramen noodle cups in CUB microwave

Narrative 8

2:46-2:51

Video transitions to Daniel and Tyler studying

Narrative 9

2:51-2:54

Close up of Tyler studying

Narrative 9

2:54-2:56

Jered Studying

Narrative 9

2:56-3:04

Video transitions into closing credits

Narrative 10

3:04-3:09

Transition into “Grove Productions” image

None

 

Script

Numbers correspond with those accompanied by “Narrative” under “Audio” on the Storyboard.

  1. Hi, I’m Brian Grove of Phi Gamma Delta at Washington State University.  Here at Fiji, we believe that ranking priorities in the order of scholarship, fraternity, and self is a key formula for fraternal and academic success.
  2. As a senior and through trial and error, I’ve seen a lot of what works and what doesn’t, especially in the all-important home stretch of the semester, dead week and finals week. So today, I would like to share with you a freshmen’s guide to the last two weeks of the semester, with tips specific to WSU and making sure that you and your friends get through finals week alive.  Thank you.
  3. First, don’t let the cold weather keep you from going class and the library.  Many teachers give hints on the content of the final and offer extra credit toward the end of the semester that is not worth missing.  Instead, bundle up.  If there’s snow, wear sunglasses to keep it out of your eyes.
  4. Second, get plenty of rest.  While it may seem beneficial to look at your note cards or study guide for as long as possible, a good-night’s sleep will really cement the knowledge in your brain.
  5. Set multiple alarms and make a list of your finals schedule so you don’t miss your exams.  Staying organized is half the battle.
  6. Stay away from prescription drugs like Adderall and Concerta and high-caffeine energy drinks to help you study.  They may help for concentration, but will leave you strung out for your tests.  However, a cup of coffee serves as a good alternative and high-protein shakes serve as a meal replacement if you don’t have time to grab food.
  7. Eat breakfast.  It will start your brain off on the right foot to help you power through those long days of studying and exams.
  8. Take advantage of the services the CUB offers.  During finals week, it is open 24-hours with reliable, high-speed internet.  It also has free coffee and refreshments after 10 p.m. and access to sinks and microwaves if you want to bring soup of leftovers from home.
  9. Finally, study with a group of focused friends.  Studying doesn’t have to be boring, it can be enjoyable.  Working with others can help you find answers you would not have otherwise found of your own. 
  10. Thanks for watching, good luck and go Cougs! 

Raw Footage

These videos are two sets of raw footage that I plan to edit and use in my final video story.

COM 210 Premiere Tutorial 2 Completed

Here is my Completed Premiere Tutorial 2 for COM 210.

COM 210 Premier Tutorial 1 Completed

Here is my finished Premier Tutorial 1.

Audio Rough Draft

In this audio project, I compiled the five files under “Raw Audio Round 2” into one audio clip. It begins with a narrative introduction, followed by the interview responses.

I received inspiration for this story after attending one of many programs that our chapter along with all other Greek organizations at WSU are required to go to thorough the year.  These programs cover a number of topics, including drug and alcohol abuse, hazing and other negative issues that normally are associated with Greek life that we are working to fix. This program in particular had to do with the current overall perception of the Greek community in the eyes of the public.  While Greek chapters at WSU had higher overall GPAs and logged countless community service hours we were still associated with the negative, “Animal House” stigmas that were brought on by the few out-liars of our organizations.  One of the points the speaker brought up was a stereotype held by outsiders that, “Greeks bought their friends.”

To be honest, I took this to heart. Not necessarily because I was offended, but because I thought it was a shame that even in this day and age when anyone of any background who attends a college with a Greek community can rush a fraternity or go through sorority recruitment and has a good chance of finding a house that is right for them, this belief that we are all rich elitists still exists.  It’s certainly not true.  As a member of Fiji, I have never felt that the dues I paid to the fraternity bought me my friends. It’s just like paying room and board at a dorm, except for the fact that we all share common values, making us a brotherhood.  So, I set out to see how my brothers and others in the Greek community felt about this statement, along with their views on brotherhood, sisterhood, their overall Greek experience at WSU and what advice they would offer to incoming students that may be curious about the Greek community, but are unsure if it will be a good fit for them.

I conducted these interviews using a hand-held recording device and edited the footage in Adobe Audition using the techniques I learned through the tutorials in this class.

Raw Audio Round 2

In this series of interviews, four Greek seniors from WSU are asked about their takes on brotherhood and sisterhood, how they feel about the stereotype that Greeks buy their friends, their Greek Life experience at WSU, and how they would address freshmen on the fence about whether or not to try Greek Life for themselves. Both Eric and Jake are Fjijs.